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Fungi Foray

Wednesday, November 11th 2015

This morning Foxglove hosted a Fungi walk led by one of our very knowledgeable volunteers. Going around the woodland trail we were introduced to some common and not so common species and given tips on identification.  Here are just some of the 30 species we saw today.

This is Birch Polypore, a common species peculiar to Birch, it's other name is Razorstrop Fungus, as it's dense composition made it useful for sharpening blades.

The intricate patterns of the Conifer Maze Gill.

This is a new species for the Reserve!  Jelly Tongue or sometimes known as Jelly Tooth.


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Wednesday 21st October 2020 | During Opening Times

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