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Don’t forget to look down!

Monday, May 5th 2014

Last week one of our volunteers, Glennis and other volunteers, went out with camera in hand to discover some of the insects found at Foxglove. Usually she spends her walking time looking up at the birds but on this occasion her eyes were firmly on the ground!

This is what they found…

A weevil is a type of beetle, they are usually less than 6 millimeters long. Most weevils have a prominent snout with jaws at the end and are mainly flightless. They are herbivorous throughout their lives.

Another weevil - Polydrusus tereticollis

There are many ladybirds on the reserve, here are just a few.

The 10-spot Ladybird is a small ladybird and confusingly it doesn't always have 10 spots! Once hatched it takes a while to develop the orange background colour. The legs of the 10 spot Ladybird are also orange, which is helpful for identification.

The 7-spot Ladybird is 'the' ladybird that everyone is familiar with and will turn up anywhere there are aphids for it to feed on.  Its seven black spots are arranged with three on each wing case and one sitting across the two wings.

Leaf Beetle is a common name for about 20,000 species of beetles distributed worldwide. Leaf beetles eat only vegetation, they have small, plump bodies, with smooth, metallic surfaces, and short legs.

This type of Leaf Beetle belongs to the species Chrysolina.



The Zebra Spider is a small but big-bodied spider, its black and white stripey pattern gives it its name. The Zebra Spider is a common jumping spider that stalks its prey before leaping on it.

The Red-breasted Carrion Beetle - Oiceoptoma thoracicum, is a scavenging, carnivorous beetle. It is unmistakable for any other British species, and is well distributed throughout the British Isles. It is a non-burying species found mainly in woodland.

Velvet Mites, often mistaken for spiders, are bright red and covered in tiny hairs. These give them a velvet appearance. Like other mites they have no antennae and instead use their front legs as feelers to check where they're going.

So, next time you're out walking on the reserve make sure to look down, you never know what you might see!


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Friends of Foxglove

The Friends of Foxglove Covert is for those individuals, families and organisations who would like to support the reserve through an annual membership subscription. Friends receive a regular newsletter and invitations to attend our various activities and social events.

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Upcoming Events


Meadow Mayhem

Saturday 4th July 2020 | 10.00am - 12 noon

Celebrate National Meadows Day!

Join us for a morning exploring the many wildflower meadows found at Foxglove. We will be learning how to ID wildflowers and grasses, as well as sweep netting for butterflies and insects and identifying them. This event is part of the Flowers of the Dales Festival

A minimum donation of £5 per person in advance to guarantee a place. Card payments can be taken by phone.

This event is free for Volunteers and Friends of the reserve.



Damsels and Dragons

Sunday 19th July 2020 | 1.00pm start

Have you ever wondered what the difference is between a Dragonfly and a Damselfly? Can you tell the difference between the different species of blue damselfly? Would you like to learn more about theses fascinating animals that have been around since prehistoric times? Join Keith Gittens for a walk around the beautiful Foxglove ponds (some of which are usually out of bounds to visitors) and observe as many different species as you can. Last year, a new species for the reserve was discovered on this event!

Booking is essential as places are limited. There is a donation of £5 per person to be paid in advance in order to secure a place. Payments now can be made on the phone.

This event is free for Volunteers and Friends of the reserve.



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The Dragonflies of Strensall and Foxglove Covert
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This book has been published with the aim of enabling people visiting these, immensely important Flagship Pond Sites in North Yorkshire, to identify the dragonflies and damselflies they encounter - by reference to a simple text and photographs. Credits - Yorkshire Dragonfly Group & Freshwater Habitats Trust

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